nicttt

nicttt:

wisdomwriter:

With so many different writing apps already out there, we take a look at the pick of the bunch and decide on our favorite.

The App Store is growing at an incredible rate. For every single possible type of app, there’s a near overwhelming amount of choice out there. That’s particularly noticeable for the writing app world. There’s enough variety out there to ensure that users can use a different writing app every day of the week for the next five years, probably. We’ve taken the time to pick out some of our favorites from the category, as we round them up and figure out just what our overall pick of the bunch is. Immediately tough to narrow things down to only half a dozen, we’ve singled out Byword, Wisdom Writer, iA Writer, Pages, Daedalus Touch and Textilus for a further look.

Read more: http://www.148apps.com/news/favorites-writing-apps/#ixzz2d807vFDI

Hi, is the new wisdom writer 2 a separate app (new app) or an upgrade ?
Nico

Hi, Wisdom Writer 2 will be a free upgrade for existing users.

With so many different writing apps already out there, we take a look at the pick of the bunch and decide on our favorite.

The App Store is growing at an incredible rate. For every single possible type of app, there’s a near overwhelming amount of choice out there. That’s particularly noticeable for the writing app world. There’s enough variety out there to ensure that users can use a different writing app every day of the week for the next five years, probably. We’ve taken the time to pick out some of our favorites from the category, as we round them up and figure out just what our overall pick of the bunch is. Immediately tough to narrow things down to only half a dozen, we’ve singled out Byword, Wisdom Writer, iA Writer, Pages, Daedalus Touch and Textilus for a further look.

Read more: http://www.148apps.com/news/favorites-writing-apps/#ixzz2d807vFDI

Helping you get started: Wisdom Writer’s templates

Wisdom Writer is all about helping you write quickly and effectively. And one way in which the app can help in this regard is with its templates. If you touch the “Templates” button in the upper left corner of a document (it looks like a plus sign), you’ll be presented with a list of different templates that you can use. I recommend exploring them for yourself, but I’ll provide a quick overview of them here so you have an idea of what each contains.

First is the Letter template. This is perfect for composing business letters or other similar communications. In the body of the document, you’ll type the main content of your letter. This is pretty simple, and the exact same as using any other sort of document in WW. Where this template really shines, though, is in the header and footer. If you scroll up from the top of the document, the header will open, allowing you to edit your company’s details, the title of the document, the date, from and to information, subject, and salutation. The closing (accessed by scrolling down from the bottom of the letter) lets you complete it with a closing, several signatures and titles, and an area for a postscript.



The Resume template provides you with a simple résumé format that will let you get down the basic items that you’d like a potential employer to know about. In the body, there are spaces for a few different employment experiences, some educational information, an explication of your skills, and an area for referrals. The header allows you to add whatever contact information you’d like. Although this is a very simple, stripped-down template, it’s really great for getting your ideas down before using a full template that you’d find in a desktop word processor or if you need to throw an updated résumé together really quickly.

If you’re a fiction writer and you’re going to be using WW, the Novel template is one that you’re likely to be using. The body of this template is pretty simple, as it’s meant for a single chapter. There’s a chapter heading, sub-chapter headings, and paragraphs for typing out your story. In the header, there’s room for title page information, a dedication, a foreword, a table of contents, and other similar things. And the footer contains space for references, an appendix, a glossary, and an index. Everything you need to get your masterwork started!

The final template, Formal Document, is a very useful one. The body consists of a heading and a few paragraphs separated by a sub-heading, and the header contains room for things like your company’s logo and contact information. While there’s no specific use implied by these fields, this is a great template for things like company memos, meeting notes, and short business plans.

As you can see, Wisdom Writer provides you with a host of very useful templates that will help you get you started on whatever it is that you’re writing. Of course, you can make whatever edits you want to your documents, but it’s often nice to have something to start with! These templates will get you up and writing in no time.


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  ga('create', 'UA-42604391-1', 'interare.com');
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Helping you get started: Wisdom Writer’s templates

Wisdom Writer is all about helping you write quickly and effectively. And one way in which the app can help in this regard is with its templates. If you touch the “Templates” button in the upper left corner of a document (it looks like a plus sign), you’ll be presented with a list of different templates that you can use. I recommend exploring them for yourself, but I’ll provide a quick overview of them here so you have an idea of what each contains.

First is the Letter template. This is perfect for composing business letters or other similar communications. In the body of the document, you’ll type the main content of your letter. This is pretty simple, and the exact same as using any other sort of document in WW. Where this template really shines, though, is in the header and footer. If you scroll up from the top of the document, the header will open, allowing you to edit your company’s details, the title of the document, the date, from and to information, subject, and salutation. The closing (accessed by scrolling down from the bottom of the letter) lets you complete it with a closing, several signatures and titles, and an area for a postscript.

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Getting to know the menu bar

If you’re a writer—whether you’re an aspiring novelist, a blogger, a journalist, an avid note-taker, or a student—then you want tools that are easy to use and that don’t have much of a learning curve so that they don’t disrupt your current workflow. Wisdom Writer is definitely one of the easiest-to-use tools out there, and will have you up and running in no time! In this article, I’ll be providing a quick tour of WW and how to best use its features to get you up and running quickly.

Once you’ve downloaded the app, open it up, and you’ll see the Getting Started document, which provides some basic information and instructions on the app. It explains how to enter the editing mode, how to get back to the document list, and things like that. But if you want to jump right in, I’ll give you the basics here.

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Wisdom Writer: For everyone, from students to professionals

I’m a PhD student, which means that I spend more time writing than doing just about anything else. I write papers, summaries, notes, plans, and all sorts of other documents, and I need a word processor that’s powerful enough and flexible enough to handle all of these different kinds of work. For a long time, I would bring my laptop with me on the train and to class, but now that I’ve discovered Wisdom Writer, I can just take my tablet!

What makes Wisdom Writer so great for students? The fact that it combines a wealth of features with portability. When I’m taking notes in class, I want to make bulleted and numbered lists, create text that is underlined and bold to remind me of important points, and make tables of information to keep my notes organized. All of these things are easy with Wisdom Writer’s intuitive interface. Another thing that I find myself doing almost constantly is making lists of things that I need to do, and the ability to create checklists in the app further adds to its usefulness.

You might be asking yourself, “I get all of these things in Microsoft Word—why do I need Wisdom Writer?” 



The beauty of Wisdom Writer is that it’s built specifically for the iPad and iPhone, meaning that a simple, clean interface and portable functionality are built in. If you can take notes on your iPad, you don’t have to lug your computer around in your backpack (this fact has certainly saved me a lot of back pain over the past year or so, as my bag is already packed with books). And the user-friendly interface means that when you want to make a change, it’s only a couple touches away. No looking through endless menus to figure out how to make the formatting changes you need.

In addition to being a student, however, I’m also a professional, which means that having the tools that I need available no matter where I am is of the utmost importance. This is where portability really comes in handy. And not only that, but my job requires a lot of writing for the internet, which means I need to make a lot of hyperlinks, include URLs in my documents, and share my work with colleagues.

When I’m writing blog posts or web content, I love the built-in Markdown functionality, which allows me to easily format my text with HTML and insert links. I used to have to write the text and then insert HTML when I got back to my laptop, but now I can do it all at once, fast, on the fly. And when it comes to sharing, Wisdom Writer can’t be beat. I can e-mail or print files directly from the interface, as well as open the text file in other programs like Evernote or Dropbox, allowing me to quickly share the files with others.

Being both a student and a professional means that my tools have to be really flexible in addition to being powerful. Between the organizational, formatting, and sharing capabilities of Wisdom Writer, all of my needs are met. And the fact that I don’t need to bring my computer with me everywhere I go anymore is a huge bonus.


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  ga('create', 'UA-42604391-1', 'interare.com');
  ga('send', 'pageview');

Wisdom Writer: For everyone, from students to professionals

I’m a PhD student, which means that I spend more time writing than doing just about anything else. I write papers, summaries, notes, plans, and all sorts of other documents, and I need a word processor that’s powerful enough and flexible enough to handle all of these different kinds of work. For a long time, I would bring my laptop with me on the train and to class, but now that I’ve discovered Wisdom Writer, I can just take my tablet!

What makes Wisdom Writer so great for students? The fact that it combines a wealth of features with portability. When I’m taking notes in class, I want to make bulleted and numbered lists, create text that is underlined and bold to remind me of important points, and make tables of information to keep my notes organized. All of these things are easy with Wisdom Writer’s intuitive interface. Another thing that I find myself doing almost constantly is making lists of things that I need to do, and the ability to create checklists in the app further adds to its usefulness.

You might be asking yourself, “I get all of these things in Microsoft Word—why do I need Wisdom Writer?”

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iPad + Wisdom Writer = Writing on-the-go

Writing on iPad would never be so easy until you use Wisdom Writer app. If you combine Wisdom Writer with external/bluetooth keyboard, word processing will even much faster and intuitive, because WW provides keyboard integration and shortcuts. WW also supports markdown, multi-markdown, and Dropbox integration. So, writing on-the-go, it’s possible.

Using Wisdom Writer for web writing: Markdown

Although Wisdom Writer provides the tools for just about any type of writing, it’s pretty likely that a lot of people will be using it for writing that is eventually destined for the internet. Whether you’re developing content or composing a blog, it’s going to be useful to have functionality that will help you efficiently create content that’s ready for the web. Of course, you could just write in plain text and then do some editing when you get back to your computer, but why not take out the middle step and just create your content in a web-friendly format in the first place?

The integration of Markdown into Wisdom Writer is one of the features that makes this a great app for creating internet-ready text quickly and easily. If you’re not familiar with Markdown, prepare to be enlightened! Markdown is a simple text-to-HTML conversion tool that lets you use simple formatting instead of complex HTML code. So whether or not you know standard HTML coding and formatting, you can learn a much easier set of symbols and conventions that will help you format your text in a way that will be properly interpreted when it’s posted online. Let’s take a look at a couple examples.

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diffinsight

diffinsight:

Markdown syntax guide #1

Based on Markdown syntax guide

Code Spans

`<code>` spans are delimited
by backticks.

<code> spans are delimited by backticks.

You can include literal backticks
like `` `this` ``.

You can include literal backticks like `this`.

␣␣␣␣indent several lines of...